Google Violates its Don't Be Evil Motto

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google violates motto

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

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  • Harry Lewis

    For

    Harry Lewis

    Dean of Harvard College, Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science at Harvard

  • Randal C. Picker

    For

    Randal C. Picker

    Paul H. and Theo Leffmann Professor of Commercial Law at the University of Chicago Law School

  • Siva Vaidhyanathan

    For

    Siva Vaidhyanathan

    Chair, Department of Media Studies, University of Virginia & Author of The Googlization of Everything

  • Esther Dyson

    Against

    Esther Dyson

    Investor and Director of 23andMe and Yandex

  • Jim Harper

    Against

    Jim Harper

    Director of Information Policy Studies at the Cato Institute

  • Jeff Jarvis

    Against

    Jeff Jarvis

    Creator and Founding Editor of Entertainment Weekly and Sunday Editor and Associate Publisher of the New York Daily News

  • Moderator Image

    Moderator

    John Donvan

    Author and correspondent for ABC News.

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Harry Lewis

For The Motion

Harry Lewis

Dean of Harvard College, Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science at Harvard

n 2003 Lewis was honored with the title of Harvard College Professor in honor of his teaching excellence. Over more than thirty years of teaching, Lewis has helped launch thousands of Harvard undergraduates into careers in computer science. He is the author of five books on computer science and co-author of Blown to Bits: Your Life, Liberty, and Happiness after the Digital Explosion (2008).

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Randal C. Picker

For The Motion

Randal C. Picker

Paul H. and Theo Leffmann Professor of Commercial Law at the University of Chicago Law School

Picker is also a senior fellow at The Computation Institute of the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory and has for a number of years taught a class at the Graduate School of Business of the University of Chicago. Picker's recent research has focused on questions relating to copyright, antitrust and network industries. He is co-author of the book, Game Theory and the Law, as well as a textbook on secured transactions.

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Siva Vaidhyanathan

For The Motion

Siva Vaidhyanathan

Chair, Department of Media Studies, University of Virginia & Author of The Googlization of Everything

A cultural historian and media scholar, Siva Vaidhyanathan is currently the Robertson Professor and the Chair of the Department of Media Studies at the University of Virginia. He also teaches at the University of Virginia School of Law. The author of The Googlization of Everything and Why We Should Worry, Vaidhyanathan is a frequent contributor to the American Scholar, The Chronicle of Higher Education, New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, Slate and The Nation. Named “one of academe’s best-known scholars of intellectual property and its role in contemporary culture” by the Chronicle of Higher Education, Vaidhyanathan has testified as an expert before the U.S. Copyright Office on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

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Esther Dyson

Against The Motion

Esther Dyson

Investor and Director of 23andMe and Yandex

Ester is well qualified to opine on Google. In 1997, she wrote Release 2.0: A Design for Living in the Digital Age, about the impact of the Internet on individuals and society. She has followed Google almost from its inception, and had (and sold) pre-IPO shares (through Kleiner Perkins). She is an investor in and director of two relevant companies: 23andMe, co-founded by Sergey Brin's wife, and Yandex, Russia's leading search engine, with approximately 60-percent market share to Google's 20.

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Jim Harper

Against The Motion

Jim Harper

Director of Information Policy Studies at the Cato Institute

A nationally recognized privacy, Internet, and technology policy expert, Jim has testified in Congress a half-dozen times and in state legislatures nationwide. He advises the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on privacy issues, and his book Identity Crisis: How Identification is Overused and Misunderstood made him a leading fighter against a U.S. national identity system. Jim's legislation tracking site WashingtonWatch.com sometimes rakes in more than ten dollars a day using Google AdSense.

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Jeff Jarvis

Against The Motion

Jeff Jarvis

Creator and Founding Editor of Entertainment Weekly and Sunday Editor and Associate Publisher of the New York Daily News

Jeff is writing a book, WWGD? - What Would Google Do?, that reverse-engineers the company's success and applies those lessons and laws to other industries. He writes about media and technology on his blog, Buzzmachine.com and for the Guardian. Jarvis is director of the interactive journalism program at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism.

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Declared Winner: For The Motion

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    3 comments

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    • Comment Link James Friday, 10 May 2013 17:56 posted by James

      I would love to see this debate done today!

    • Comment Link Ali Tuesday, 26 March 2013 14:17 posted by Ali

      Hey, thanks for the props.To explian my full-text postings: For a variety of reasons that would take too long to explian in comments, posting of entire Web-based articles about which one is commenting on a not-for-profit Web site is almost never an infringement. And posting them on a for-profit site is rarely and infringement.The reason is the self-help or notice-and-takedown provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. This and the landmark case Kelly v. ArribaSoft made clear that different copyright norms exist for the Web world and the real world. That said, Google has built its entire Web search empire on the act of copying Web sites into its index in total, without permission, without compensation. And that's good.But in Book Search, Google is reaching into the real world and forcing it to comply with the norms of the Web world. And that's not necessarily good. Or, at least, it's likely to cause more trouble than it solves because courts will recoil.This is all in the context of Hollywood and Microsoft trying to undermine the notice-and-takedown provisions of the DMCA.As I said. Long story.

    • Comment Link Joe Song Monday, 15 October 2012 11:43 posted by Joe Song

      I wonder what this debate would sound like now that Google has pulled out of China because of the very censorship issues used to clobber Google here. Would also be interesting in the context of the Google-Apple fallout

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