Universal Health Coverage Should be the Federal Government's Responsibility

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universal health coverage

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

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  • Art Kellermann

    For

    Art Kellermann

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and Associate Dean for Health Policy at Emory University

  • Paul Krugman

    For

    Paul Krugman

    Professor of Economics & International Affairs, Princeton; Centenary Professor, London School of Economics; Op-Ed Columnist, The New York Times

  • Michael Rachlis

    For

    Michael Rachlis

    Physician and Health Policy Analyst

  • Michael F. Cannon

    Against

    Michael F. Cannon

    Cato Institute's Director of Health Policy Studies

  • Sally C. Pipes

    Against

    Sally C. Pipes

    President and Chief Executive Officer of the Pacific Research Institute

  • john Stossel 90x90

    Against

    John Stossel

    FOX Business News Anchor & Commentator

  • Moderator Image

    Moderator

    John Donvan

    Author and correspondent for ABC News.

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Art Kellermann

For The Motion

Art Kellermann

Professor of Emergency Medicine and Associate Dean for Health Policy at Emory University

Art works clinically in the ER of Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta’s only public hospital and Level I trauma center. A member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies, Kellermann co-chaired the IOM’s Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance, which issued six comprehensive reports on this topic between 2001 and 2004./p> Learn more

Paul Krugman

For The Motion

Paul Krugman

Professor of Economics & International Affairs, Princeton University; Centenary Professor, London School of Economics; Op-Ed Columnist, The New York Times

Krugman is the author or editor of 20 books and more than 200 papers in professional journals and edited volumes, many of them on international trade and finance. He is a recipient of the John Bates Clark Medal from the American Economic Association, an award given every two years to the top economist under the age of 40, and was named “the most important political columnist in America” by the Washington Monthly.

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Michael Rachlis

For The Motion

Michael Rachlis

Physician and Health Policy Analyst

Michael has consulted to all ten Canadian provinces, the federal government, and two Royal Commissions. He has also been invited to address two US Congressional committees. He is an associate professor with the University of Toronto Department of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health. Rachlis is the author of three national bestsellers on the Canadian health care system.

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Michael F. Cannon

Against The Motion

Michael F. Cannon

Cato Institute's Director of Health Policy Studies

Previously, Cannon served as a domestic policy analyst for the U.S. Senate Republican Policy Committee, advising Senate leadership on health care. His articles have been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics, and Forum for Health Economics & Policy. Cannon is co-author of Healthy Competition: What’s Holding Back Health Care and How to Free It.

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Sally C. Pipes

Against The Motion

Sally C. Pipes

President and Chief Executive Officer of the Pacific Research Institute

The Pacific Research Institute is a California-based think tank founded in 1979. Pipes is an expert in the Canadian and American health systems, Pipes writes, speaks, debates and gives invited testimony on key health care issues facing America. She is the author of Miracle Cure: How to Solve America’s Health Care Crisis and Why Canada Isn’t the Answer, in addition to numerous op-eds, TV, and radio appearances.

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john Stossel 90x90

Against The Motion

John Stossel

FOX Business News Anchor & Commentator

The host of “Stossel,” a weekly program airing Thursdays at 10 PM EST and midnight on Fox Business Network, John Stossel has received 19 Emmy Awards and has been honored five times for excellence in consumer reporting by the National Press Club. Stossel also appears regularly on Fox News Channel providing signature analysis. Prior to joining FBN, Stossel co-anchored ABC’s primetime newsmagazine show, 20/20. Earlier in his career, Stossel served as consumer editor at Good Morning America and as a reporter at WCBS-TV in New York City. He is a graduate of Princeton University, with a B.A. in psychology, and his economic programs have been adapted into teaching kits watched by more than 12 million students every year.

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Declared Winner: Against The Motion

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    4 comments

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    • Comment Link Ranjith Tuesday, 18 December 2012 14:03 posted by Ranjith

      Unions are like politicians; they're good for a while in bringing troubled issues to the public light, but then they always become corrupt and further burden the system. The several unions in the US Postal Service are a prime example of management and the union eating up the company profits, a percentage of which could have been passed down to the people who actually work for a living had upper management been paying attention to their business. When you take care of the employees, they will take care of you. When you treat them like cattle, they'll just shit everywhere, and looking at how Washington has been treating our population lately, their solution is to up the spending for FEMA/DHS and build more "Relocation Centers", as if the 850+ they have now isn't enough. I worked for an employer one time who put up a suggestion box. After he kept getting four letter suggestions about where he could relocate that suggestion box, he took it down. He didn't address the problem of WHY he was getting those responses, he just assumed that his workforce wasn't worth interfacing with. For all the big bucks he was making, his managerial skills couldn't figure out how to deal with the rampant apathy; not unlike the caliber of "managers" we have in Washington. They can't figure out how to solve the problem, but they positively refuse to relinquish any control to people who might possibly have a different plan.

    • Comment Link Kim Saturday, 27 October 2012 20:00 posted by Kim

      Unions are like politicians; they're good for a while in brniigng troubled issues to the public light, but then they always become corrupt and further burden the system. The several unions in the US Postal Service are a prime example of management and the union eating up the company profits, a percentage of which could have been passed down to the people who actually work for a living had upper management been paying attention to their business. When you take care of the employees, they will take care of you. When you treat them like cattle, they'll just shit everywhere, and looking at how Washington has been treating our population lately, they're solution is to up the spending for FEMA/DHS and build more "Relocation Centers", as if the 850+ they have now isn't enough. I worked for an employer one time who put up a suggestion box. After he kept getting four letter suggestions about where he could relocate that suggestion box, he took it down. He didn't address the problem of WHY he was getting those responses, he just assumed that his workforce wasn't worth interfacing with. For all the big bucks he was making, his managerial skills couldn't figure out how to deal with the rampant apathy; not unlike the caliber of "managers" we have in Washington. They can't figure out how to solve the problem, but they positively refuse to relinquish any control to people who might possibly have a different plan.

    • Comment Link Joe Song Monday, 15 October 2012 11:01 posted by Joe Song

      I'm amazed that this point didn't come up, but the fact of the matter is that we already have universal healthcare. If you go to an ED, you will be seen, regardless of ability to pay or whether you have insurance. The problem is how we pay for the visit and the lack of primary care coverage.

      right now, people without insurance are showing up to the ED with preventable illnesses that are much cheaper to treat through the primary system-- things like obesity, diabetes, heart disease. but they don't have insurance or are underinsured, so these problems reach crisis points and they end up receiving urgent, life saving care which doesn't solve the base issue. these people are getting care. just not the right kind.

    • Comment Link Anurag Sunday, 09 September 2012 10:57 posted by Anurag

      Unions are like politicians; they're good for a while in brgiinng troubled issues to the public light, but then they always become corrupt and further burden the system. The several unions in the US Postal Service are a prime example of management and the union eating up the company profits, a percentage of which could have been passed down to the people who actually work for a living had upper management been paying attention to their business. When you take care of the employees, they will take care of you. When you treat them like cattle, they'll just shit everywhere, and looking at how Washington has been treating our population lately, they're solution is to up the spending for FEMA/DHS and build more "Relocation Centers", as if the 850+ they have now isn't enough. I worked for an employer one time who put up a suggestion box. After he kept getting four letter suggestions about where he could relocate that suggestion box, he took it down. He didn't address the problem of WHY he was getting those responses, he just assumed that his workforce wasn't worth interfacing with. For all the big bucks he was making, his managerial skills couldn't figure out how to deal with the rampant apathy; not unlike the caliber of "managers" we have in Washington. They can't figure out how to solve the problem, but they positively refuse to relinquish any control to people who might possibly have a different plan.

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