Don't Give Us Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Huddled Masses

Next Debate Previous Debate
Press Freedom

Tuesday, May 3

America, built up by the hard work of its immigrants, now finds itself home to an estimated 11 million illegal immigrants. The federal government, even under the reform-friendly tenure of President George W. Bush, has been unable to find the consensus to overhaul our country’s immigration laws. Both the Dream Act and an Arizona statute requiring police officers to detain anyone they suspect to be illegal, has brought the debate back to the forefront of national politics. Are immigrants taking American jobs, or, does immigration help our economy? Is there any difference between low-skilled and highly-skilled immigrants, and, if so, is it time to honor this distinction?

  • For the motion

    For

    Kris Kobach

    Secretary of State for Kansas

  • For the motion

    For

    Tom Tancredo

    Former Congressman for Colorado

  • Against the Motion

    Against

    Tamar Jacoby

    President and CEO of ImmigrationWorks USA

  • Against the motion

    Against

    Mayor Julian Castro

    Mayor of San Antonio

  • Moderator Image

    Moderator

    John Donvan

    Author and correspondent for ABC News.

More about the Panelists
See Results See Full Debate Video Purchase DVD Read Transcript
Listen to the edited radio broadcast

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Listen to the unedited radio broadcast

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Subscribe to the Podcast
Kobach

For The Motion

Kris Kobach

Secretary of State for Kansas

Is the secretary of state for Kansas and former professor of constitutional law at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. He served as counsel to Attorney General John Ashcroft during the Bush administration, where he led Department of Justice efforts to prevent terrorists from exploiting gaps in U.S. immigration controls. Kobach is well known nationally for his role as co-author of Arizona’s SB 1070 illegal immigration law and has litigated some of the most significant immigration-related cases in the country.

Learn more
Tancredo

For The Motion

Tom Tancredo

Former Congressman for Colorado

Is a former Republican congressman from Colorado (1999-2009). He sought the 2008 Republican nomination for President of the United States with the intention of forcing the immigration issue into the debate. In 2010, Tancredo ran as the Constitution Party's nominee for governor of Colorado. Tancredo served as the Secretary of Education's regional representative under Presidents Reagan and Bush, and founded two not-for-profit education organizations, the Rocky Mountain Foundation and the American Legacy Alliance.

Learn more
Castro

Against The Motion

Mayor Julian Castro

Mayor of San Antonio

Is the 36-year-old mayor of San Antonio, making him the youngest mayor of a Top 50 American city. In 2001, at the age of 26, Mayor Castro became the youngest elected city councilman in San Antonio history. Throughout his tenure in public service, he has championed a vision of economic growth and a top-notch quality of life for all San Antonians. In 2005, Castro founded the Law Offices of Julián Castro, PLLC, a civil litigation practice. He earned his undergraduate degree from Stanford University with honors and distinction in 1996 and a juris doctorate from Harvard Law School in 2000.

Learn more
Sanger

Against The Motion

Tamar Jacoby

President and CEO of ImmigrationWorks USA

Is president and CEO of ImmigrationWorks USA, a national federation working to advance better immigration law. She is the author of Someone Else’s House: America’s Unfinished Struggle for Integration, and editor of Reinventing the Melting Pot: The New Immigrants and What It Means To Be American, a collection of essays about immigrant integration. From 1989 to 2007, she was a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. Before that, she was a senior writer and justice editor for Newsweek and the deputy editor of the New York Times op-ed page (1981 – 1987).

Learn more

Declared Winner: For The Motion

Online Voting

About This Event

Event Photos

PrevNext Arrows
    PrevNext Arrows

    4 comments

    0|-
    • Comment Link Michael Kirchmann Thursday, 20 February 2014 15:54 posted by Michael Kirchmann

      If you believe undocumented common laborers do not benefit the economy you simply do not know the facts. Technology is great, but not all work can be accomplished with technical advancements. As for lowering wages, this would not be legally possible if firm minimum wage laws were in effect and supported.

    • Comment Link Michael Peagler Saturday, 16 November 2013 12:26 posted by Michael Peagler

      Mr. Sanchez, Are there no skilled or educated immigrants in the US or awaiting to come to the US? Are all untrained unmotivated and unskilled? Is this why wages are going down? You might want to research where different technologies come from and how and if it's allowed on the market. No genius can just break into the market unless his product can be controlled by the "powers" of the market Check from microprocessors to telephones to autos to anything motorized or transistorized. Check who's producing it There are business models and plans worldwide, but some products are available and some not. There are "controls" that are not talked about or known publicly in general The US holds no monopoly ( like they do in oil) ,just laws regulation and practices that try and limit our markets from being over run. Also you might ask yourself what product can the US produce, market and sell cheaper than the rest of the world and make a profit? Then check who it's outsourced to and where the demand is. Standards of living can only be raised in targeted areas whether they be states, counties or cities. I really believe gone our the days of mass production supremacy for the US. Today almost everyone can produce or be an outsource to a corporation outside the US and import and export wherever the money calls.

    • Comment Link John Shepard Thursday, 14 November 2013 12:44 posted by John Shepard

      Give us your skilled, your innovators, your individuals, those born with the American spirit outside our borders. We will take them, let them rise to heights you were afraid they would. Give us those who value liberty above the rest, give us those who want to be self reliant instead of dependent. Give us not only your best and brightest but those with spirit.

    • Comment Link Julian Sanchez Thursday, 14 November 2013 12:31 posted by Julian Sanchez

      Our economy isn't industrial, or agrarian base, we cannot afford a massive mob of uneducated and unskilled individuals lowering wages. That is what innovation is for, to mechanize mundane labor and outperform other nations relying on quantity over quality. If we apply technology that we already have the United States would be the world supplier of anything and everything. A mechanized assembly line could deliver computers, toys and cars cheaper than any 1,000's of unskilled workers could. And instead we would raise the standard of living in our soil by raising the demand for IT specialists, teachers, programmers etc...

    Leave a comment

    Make sure you enter the (*) required information where indicated. HTML code is not allowed.