It's Time To End The War On Terror

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War on Terror

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Days after 9/11, President Bush declared a War on Terror that would “not end until every terrorist group of global reach has been found, stopped and defeated.” Is America in a state of perpetual war, or has the threat of terrorism justified its position as the organizing principle behind our foreign policy? In 10 years we’ve been in 2 wars, witnessed the Arab Spring and the death of Osama bin Laden–is it finally time to end the War on Terror?

  • For the motion

    For

    Peter Bergen

    CNN National Security Analyst, Bestselling Author

  • For the motion

    For

    Juliette Kayyem

    Terrorism Specialist and Homeland Security Expert

  • Against the motion

    Against

    Michael Hayden

    Former Director of the CIA and NSA

  • Against the motion

    Against

    Richard Falkenrath

    Homeland Security Policy Adviser to Pres. Bush, 2001-2003

  • Moderator Image

    Moderator

    John Donvan

    Author and correspondent for ABC News.

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Bergen

For The Motion

Peter Bergen

CNN National Security Analyst, Bestselling Author

One of few Americans to have interviewed Osama bin Laden face-to-face, Peter Bergen is one of today’s foremost commentators on America’s national security and the War on Terror. Author of two New York Times bestsellers, Bergen’s recent release The Longest War: The Enduring Conflict Between America and Al-Qaeda has been called “one of the most important accounts on the subject” by the newspaper. He is Editor of the AfPak Channel, a premiere clearinghouse of news covering Afghanistan, Pakistan and issues of transnational terrorism. Bergen is also the Director of the National Security Program at the New America Foundation and a Research Fellow at NYU’s Center on Law and Security.

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Kayyem

For The Motion

Juliette Kayyem

Terrorism Specialist and Homeland Security Expert

Juliette Kayyem formerly served under the Obama Administration as Assistant Secretary for Intergovernmental Affairs at the Department of Homeland Security. With nearly 15 years of experience in counterterrorism and homeland security, she was Massachusetts’ first Undersecretary for Homeland Security, a member of the National Commission on Terrorism, and a legal advisor to Attorney General Janet Reno. Kayyem, named a CNN/Fortune Magazine’s People to Watch, co-wrote the critically acclaimed Preserving Liberty in an Age of Terror. The highest ranking Arab-American woman in federal government, she now is a professor at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and a foreign affairs columnist for the Boston Globe.

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Falkenrath

Against The Motion

Richard Falkenrath

Homeland Security Policy Adviser to Pres. Bush, 2001-2003

Richard Falkenrath, who was the Deputy Assistant to President Bush and Deputy Homeland Security Advisor, is no stranger to the complexities involved with the United States’ large-scale effort to combat terrorism. The principal author of the National Strategy for Homeland Security, Falkenrath also served as Senior Director of Policy and Plans within the Office of Homeland Security after 9/11. As the Deputy Commissioner for Counterterrorism at the New York Police Department from 2006 to 2010, Falkenrath strengthened the city’s overall effort to prevent, prepare for and respond to terrorist attacks. Falkenrath is now Principal at The Chertoff Group, a global security and risk-management advisory firm, an Adjunct Sr. Fellow for Counterterrorism and Homeland Security at the Council on Foreign Relations, and a Contributing Editor at Bloomberg News.

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Hayden

Against The Motion

Michael Hayden

Former Director of the CIA and NSA

With a prolific career in national security – from serving 39 years in the U.S. Air Force to directing the NSA for six years – General Michael Hayden has overseen nearly every branch of the intelligence community. Once the highest ranking military intelligence officer in the country, Hayden later became the Director of the CIA in 2006, gaining unprecedented access to the collection of information concerning the plans, intentions and capabilities of America’s adversaries. His remarkable list of senior positions includes Commander of the Air Intelligence Agency, Director of the Joint Command and Control Warfare Center and Chief of the Central Security Service. He is currently a Principal at The Chertoff Group focusing on global political and terrorist risk analysis.

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Declared Winner: For The Motion

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    1 comment

    • Comment Link Jim Thursday, 04 October 2012 13:36 posted by Jim

      In my opinion the people for the motion to end the WoT did a terrible job of defining what they were really opposed to. Maybe it's because I'm a civil libertarian or maybe it's because Juliette didn't want to attack it directly given her position, but I was shocked that there was no mention of the biggest elephant in the room that was a byproduct of the WoT: that it became a mandate for our Federal Government to give itself unprecedented power via the PATRIOT act, and that power has since been used for many reasons other than fighting terrorism. Studies by Congress have unearthed hundreds of cases in which the FBI, DEA and other agencies have invoked PATRIOT Act powers in domestic investigations that had nothing to do with terrorism. Why do this? Because it gives law enforcement a lot more leeway in avoiding due process. Unfortunately, as the opposition so succinctly pointed out, the side for the motion was not really interested in ending the "War on Terror"... they simply wanted to repackage it as something else. In my opinion if they really believed the WoT should end, they would have criticized the abuses of power it has since enabled.

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